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Bachelor's Program in Physics Bridgeville PA

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Duquesne University
(412) 396-6000
600 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA
Tuition
Tuition Costs : $23475
School Information
Type of Institution : University
Institutional Designation : Private—Religious

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University of Pittsburgh
(412) 624-4141
4200 Fifth Avenue First Floor
Pittsburgh, PA
Tuition
Full-Time In-State Tuition Costs : $12832
Full-Time Non-Resident Tuition Costs : $22480
School Information
Type of Institution : University
Institutional Designation : Public—State-related

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Washington & Jefferson College
(724) 503-1001
60 South Lincoln Street
Washington, PA
Tuition
Tuition Costs : $31096
School Information
Type of Institution : Four-Year college
Institutional Designation : Private—Nonprofit

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Community College of Allegheny County
(412) 323-2323
800 Allegheny Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA
Tuition
Full-Time Area Tuition Costs : $2678
Full-Time In-State Tuition Costs : $5052
Full-Time Non-Resident Tuition Costs : $7426
School Information
Type of Institution : Two-Year college
Institutional Designation : Public—County

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West Chester University of Pennsylvania
(610) 436-1000
Messikomer Hall Rosedale Avenue
West Chester, PA
Tuition
Full-Time In-State Tuition Costs : $5358
Full-Time Non-Resident Tuition Costs : $13396
School Information
Type of Institution : Comprehensive higher education system
Institutional Designation : Public—State

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Carnegie Mellon University
(412) 268-2000
5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA
Tuition
Tuition Costs : $39150
School Information
Type of Institution : University
Institutional Designation : Private—Nonprofit

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Chatham University
(412) 365-1100
Woodland Road
Pittsburgh, PA
Tuition
Tuition Costs : $26475
School Information
Type of Institution : University
Institutional Designation : Private—Nonprofit

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Pennsylvania State University McKeesport Campus of the Commonwealth College
(412) 675-9010
4000 University Drive
McKeesport, PA
Tuition
Full-Time In-State Tuition Costs : $11008
Full-Time Non-Resident Tuition Costs : $16798
School Information
Type of Institution : Two-Year college
Institutional Designation : Public—State-related

Data Provided By:
East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania
(570) 422-3211
200 Prospect Street
East Stroudsburg, PA
Tuition
Full-Time In-State Tuition Costs : $5358
Full-Time Non-Resident Tuition Costs : $13396
School Information
Type of Institution : Comprehensive higher education system
Institutional Designation : Public—State

Data Provided By:
Juniata College
(814) 641-3000
1700 Moore Street
Huntingdon, PA
Tuition
Tuition Costs : $29610
School Information
Type of Institution : Four-Year college
Institutional Designation : Private—Religious

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Physicist

How to become a Physicist

A physicist is a man or woman of science, a bringer of knowledge, a man or woman that studies or uses physics knowledge to practice his job. Physicists study all sorts of physical phenomena at the micro and macro scale, from sub-atomic particles to the wonders of the Universe as a whole.

To become a physicist you will require a doctoral degree. Any position in the field, whether applied physics or research, will require you to have a doctoral degree in physics. Your specialization will be dictated when acquiring your master's degree. You can specialize in experimental or theoretical physics, as follows: atomic physics, astrophysics, geophysics, molecular physics, biophysics, chemical physics, optics, particle physics, sub-atomic physics, condensed matter physics and many others. Some positions, especially in highly classified research, will most likely necessitate some sort of post-doctoral experience.

If you want to be a high-school physics teacher, all you need is a bachelor's degree in physics and some teacher certificates, but if you want more, you'll have to go the full length to become a Doctor of Physics. You'll need to be passionate about your work, as you'll no doubt face many obstacles in your career, whether you're employed or fighting for a job or you're a researcher, trying to get grants to continue the research. You also have to keep in mind that the competition is very fierce, since you'll be up against physicists from around the world.

Most technical universities in the United States can be used to achieve your doctoral degree, the most famous of all being MIT, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

After you complete your education you'll need to think of your career, make a plan, and start following it. Since this is one of the hardest and most competitive jobs on the planet, you will need to have a sound plan before embarking on your career.

What does a Physicist do?

A physicist is someone that studies physics or uses physics knowledge as a means of earning a living, whether it's researching or patent counseling. A physicist doesn't necessarily have to work specifically in theoretical and experimental physics, but could work in other related fields, such as engineering, finance, computer science and technology development.

As a physicist you can even become a software engineer or a systems developer, or you can become a theoretical physicist and do your research with funding from different organizations. You can work as a university teacher, or as a government physicist. There are a lot of opportunities for you, depending on your specialization. You can even work on the next big things in technology, such as nano-technologies, advanced AI or robotics. If you're talented, you can even start writing books about physics, and make a living out of that.

There are three major employers of physicists in the United States: academic institutions, private indust...

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